Family & Children

In recent decades, European societies have witnessed fundamental changes in family functions and roles. These changes also have implications for reproductive strategies. Most European countries have experienced declining fertility rates, a diversification of family forms, and increased female labour force participation. Since the emergence of the modern welfare state, there has been general agreement in Europe that the state should influence the general conditions for families. However, the motivations for and the instruments of family policies differ widely (see, e.g., Neyer, 2003 for details).

This collection identifies comparable regulations for family policies over time, focusing on the following fields:

Find more about the family policies in:

 

Bibliography
Neyer, G. (2003). Family Policies and Low Fertility in Western Europe. In: Journal of Population and Social Security (Population) 1: 46-93.

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